Hayfork Creek, 1963. Close-up of Pacific lamprey moving up steep rocks at natural waterfall, pre-fish ladder. Photo provided by Damon Goodman, United States Fish and Wildlife Service

By Lenya Quinn-Davidson On a typical summer weekend in the late 1990s, you might have found me amid other teenagers, all lounging in the sun a few miles up the road from my house at one of our favorite swimming holes. At this place, the cool waters of Hayfork Creek tumble through a series of…

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Prosper Ridge Prarie Restoration Phase 7 Map, May 2020. Map by Hugh McGee

By Hugh McGee, Program Director,Mattole Restoration Council Over the past several years Mattole Restoration Council (MRC) has been working with the Mattole Salmon Group, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), various federal and state agencies, and local contractors to implement multiple phases of two important ecosystem restoration projects in the King Range National Conservation Area:…

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An aerial view of the proposed site for teh Nordic Aquafarms facility on the Samoa Peninsula in Humboldt Bay, CA. Photo NAF Archives

By Salmonid Restoration Foundation In May 2020, the Salmonid Restoration Foundation (SRF) was awarded a grant from the Rose Foundation’s California Watershed Protection Fund for its project on Humboldt Bay Aquaculture Research, Outreach, and Education. This project proposes to track the Nordic Aquafarms project (NAF), advocate on behalf of the community, communicate important information to…

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Sproul Creek Photo by Katrina Nystrom

By Salmonid Restoration Federation The South Fork Eel River provides critical habitat for coho salmon and other aquatic species including steelhead, red-tailed frogs, lamprey, and Pacific giant salamanders. Juvenile salmon utilize different parts of the watershed from the tributaries to the mainstem during various stages of their life cycle. The forested tributaries of the South…

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Mid-Eel Watershed Steward and Round Valley elder Ron Lincoln Sr., with his granddaughter Hazel at left, giving the blessing at teh Round Valley Salmon Awareness Festival in 2016.

This spring, Trees Foundation was thrilled to welcome Mid-Eel Watershed Stewards (MEWS) into our Fiscal Sponsorship umbrella. Fiscal Sponsorship is one of the primary ways that Trees Foundation supports the North Coast grassroots environmental community. It allows groups to move swiftly forward in accomplishing their objectives, while we handle the 501(c)3 bookkeeping and financial reporting required to accept tax-deductible donations and grant funding. We asked MEWS founding member Mickey Bailey to share more with Forest & River News readers about this emerging organization.

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image of a Roosevelt Elk eating grass in the wild

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife recently announced that Treponeme-associated hoof disease (TAHD), a bacterial-associated syndrome causing severe lameness in elk, has been discovered in elk in Del Norte County. TAHD is already present in elk in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The current disease appears traceable to earlier outbreaks in herds in Southwest Washington in the mid-’90s. From their experience, we understand that this disease is likely to cause significant disruptions to California’s elk.

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These four concrete barriers on Alderpoint Road in Trees Foundation's hometown of Garberville, CA are known to mysteriously change periodically to reflect the times. The message "Ditch the Systemic Racism" appeared shortly after the death of George Floyd on May 25, 2020, and remains today. Photo by Kerry Reynolds.

The U.S. legacy of slavery and systemic racism has enabled Big Oil to commit legions of environmental crimes and human rights abuses, especially against brown-skinned people in developing nations, while accelerating the climate crisis. We’ll never be able to stop the machine of domination that is rapidly destroying our ecosystems until we acknowledge how our values and actions support and permit it.

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Save California Salmon Tribal Water Organizer Morning Star Gali (in center of photograph with fist raised) advocated with other Indigenous activists for the removal of this statue of John Sutter. The statue stood outside Sutter Medical Center in Sacramento, CA for many years until this day on June 15, 2020. Sutter was a 19th century European colonizer of California who enslaved hundreds of Native Americans. Photo by H.J. Tsinhnahjinnie

“…We’re in a moment when people are paying attention to that, and people are listening to us, and people are listening when we say that it’s time to tear down white supremacy, it’s time to get rid of these racist statues, that we don’t need monuments to genocide anymore. That’s part of why I’m here, to help give my community that platform so then they’ll be able to tell their own stories in their own voices.”

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Large cutdown tree in a forest
Mature forest felled on RAinbow Ridge. This is what is at issue on Rainbow Ridge: the last remnants of mature forest. Photo by Mattole Forest Defense

Insist on California setting a course that will take generations of commitment to return healthy, high-quality forests to our region—and not settle for 5 years of “stepped-up pace and scale” of thinning and prescribed fire. Attaining larger and older trees is integral to fighting climate change and as necessary as human communities’ need to reform settlement patterns and impacts. See Why Forests Matter’s website, and for California’s emergency moving parts, processes, documents, and recordings, go to
fmtf.fire.ca.gov

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