Tell PG&E to STOP Ravaging our Trees and FIX their Infrastructure Instead!

The Redwood Chapter of Sierra Club is leading a campaign to demand that PG&E stops ravaging our trees and instead invests in modern infrastructure that will greatly reduce wildfire risk. State leaders must hold PG&E accountable for its negligence. Why This Matters PG&E’s antiquated infrastructure is vulnerable to high winds and its outdated lines create…

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The Cereus Fund of Trees Foundation Continues to Help Grassroots Environmental Advocacy in the Redwoods Region

The following pages highlight grassroots environmental projects supported by the Cereus Fund of Trees Foundation in 2021. Established in 1998, the Cereus Fund is a part of Trees Foundation’s Donor Advised Program which allows individuals to donate and direct funding to projects of their choice, which Trees Foundation administers on their behalf. To learn more…

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Community Organizing for Fire Resilience

The following is a partial transcript of the “Pathways to Fire Resilience” webinar held on Oct. 3rd in lieu of an in-person Trees Foundation 30th Anniversary event, which was postponed due to COVID-19 concerns. Ali Freedlund was the first presenter, followed by Margo Robbins, Lenya Quinn-Davidson, Tim Bailey, Will Harling, and Cybelle Immitt. To view…

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Nature Boy

In Memoriam By Ellen Taylor At his memorial, said Yarrow They all mentioned How much his time up in Humboldt meant to him: How he loved the people, rivers, trees. For him, it was An enchanted time, a luminous island, which would slip fast away Into the wake of a life that, later, grew daily…

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Bull Kelp

Nereocystis luetkeana It is amazing that something can grow up to 200 feet in one year! Bull kelp is the fastest-growing seaweed in the world and can grow up to two feet per day. This is especially amazing because bull kelp is an annual—germinating, growing, reproducing, and dying all within a year-long cycle. Bull kelp…

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Restoring Native Grass Species Can Help Reduce High-Intensity Fire Risk

Eel River Restoration Project By Kirsten Hill and Pat Higgins Recent California fires have been devastating, and experts tell us that such catastrophic events are likely to recur. Three causal mechanisms are: years of wildland fire suppression, impacts of climate change, and the continual spread of invasive grasses that exacerbate the intensity of fires—a factor…

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The Struggle to Save Richardson Grove Continues

Environmental Protection Information Center For more than a decade, EPIC and our allies have fought off the misguided and controversial Richardson Grove Project, a proposal to realign a section of Highway 101 that runs through the ancient redwoods of Richardson Grove State Park. While we have held off the bulldozers and cement trucks through successive…

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Human Nature: Comedy of the Wild

Human Nature Human Nature has been producing theater—mostly comedy and musical comedy—about crucial environmental and social issues since 1979. Their shows tend to be bawdy, tragi-comic, and absolutely serious all at once. They have moved, delighted, and pissed off audiences from South Africa to Istanbul to New York City to Briceland, CA. The company’s initial…

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Climate-Smart Conservation in the Klamath Mountains

Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center By Alexi Lovechio Here in northern California we are surrounded by one of the largest carbon reserves in the Northern Hemisphere. Forests capture and store carbon, which helps offset pollution that causes climate change. Old-growth forests—containing trees that are often centuries old in a rich bed of living soil—are extremely efficient at…

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